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Warm Hand-Off Summits: Regional Information

 

Northwest

 Assessment survey respondents in this region identified the following top five challenges to warm hand-off:
 
  1. Scarce availability for admission to opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  2. Complexities in insurance coverage and/or payment for services.
  3. Improving relationships between hospitals and OUD treatment providers in the region.
  4. Knowledge about the warm hand-off process is lost with hospital/health system staff turnover.
  5. Scarce availability for admission to opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Respondents were also asked to list any other challenges or barriers for the seamless transfer of care for opioid overdose survivors from the emergency department to OUD treatment. The most frequently cited responses for this region (in order of frequency) are:

  1. Lack of available beds/level of care required
  2. Lack of 24/7 availability
  3. Staff in the ED not contacting the SCA
  4. Refusal or ambivalence by patient or family
  5. Lack of availability or wait time for next step in warm hand-off process
  6. Lack of funding/payer issues
Assessment survey respondents in this region identified the following top five challenges to warm hand-off:
  1. Scarce availability for admission to opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m..
  2. Improving relationships between hospitals and OUD treatment providers in the region.
  3. Difficulty securing transportation to transfer to OUD treatment between 12 a.m. and 8 p.m.
  4. Scarce availability for admission to opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m.
  5. Complexities in insurance coverage and/or payment for services

Respondents were also asked to list any other challenges or barriers for the seamless transfer of care for opioid overdose survivors from the emergency department to OUD treatment. The most frequently cited responses for this region (in order of frequency) are:

  1. Stigma
  2. Refusal or ambivalence by patient or family
  3. Limited availability of Certified Recovery Specialists (CRSs)
  4. Lack of availability or wait time for next step in warm hand-off process
  5. Lack of physician waivers
  6. Lack of linkages and interdisciplinary collaboration

 
Assessment survey respondents in this region identified the following top five challenges to warm hand-off:

  1. Difficulty securing transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  2. There is scarce availability for admission to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  3. The relationship between hospitals and OUD treatment providers in this area needs improvement.
  4. There are complexities in insurance coverage/payment for services.
  5. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Respondents were also asked to list any other challenges or barriers for the seamless transfer of care for opioid overdose survivors from the emergency department to OUD treatment. The most frequently cited responses for this region (in order of frequency) are:

  1. Stigma
  2. Lack of funding/payer issues
  3. Lack of available beds/level of care required
  4. Refusal or ambivalence by patient or family
  5. Not all counties equally engaged
  6. Limited availability of CRSs
  7. Lack of continuity of care/social support system

 
Assessment survey respondents in this region identified the following top five challenges to warm hand-off:

  1. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  2. There is scarce availability for admission to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  3. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m.
  4. The relationship between hospitals and OUD treatment providers in this area needs improvement.
  5. There are complexities in insurance coverage/payment for services.

 
Respondents were also asked to list any other challenges or barriers for the seamless transfer of care for opioid overdose survivors from the emergency department to OUD treatment. The most frequently cited responses for this region (in order of frequency) are:

  1. ED staff awareness of warm hand-off protocols (training issue and willingness)
  2. Refusal or ambivalence by patient or family
  3. Lack of available beds/level of care required
  4. Lack of availability or wait time for next step in warm hand-off process
  5. Paperwork/”red tape”
  6. Stigma
  7. Lack of physician waivers
  8. Lack of safe housing
  9. Lack of 24/7 availability

 

Southcentral

 
Assessment survey respondents in this region identified the following top five challenges to warm hand-off:

  1. The relationship between hospitals and OUD treatment providers in this area needs improvement.
  2. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  3. There is scarce availability for admission to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  4. There are complexities in insurance coverage/payment for services.
  5. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Respondents were also asked to list any other challenges or barriers for the seamless transfer of care for opioid overdose survivors from the emergency department to OUD treatment. The most frequently cited responses for this region (in order of frequency) are:

  1. Refusal or ambivalence by patient or family
  2. Availability or wait time for next step in warm hand-off process
  3. Mixed philosophies about standards of practice and MAT
  4. Lack of physician waivers
  5. Stigma
  6. Resources
  7. Lack of available beds/level of care required
  8. Lack of training
  9. Lack of continuity of care/social support system
  10. Lack of funding/payer issues

 

Southeast

Assessment survey respondents in this region identified the following top five challenges to warm hand-off:

  1. The relationship between hospitals and OUD treatment providers in this area needs improvement.
  2. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m..
  3. There is scarce availability for admission to OUD treatment from 12 a.m. to 8 a.m.
  4. There are complexities in insurance coverage/payment for services.
  5. It is difficult to secure transportation to transfer to OUD treatment from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Respondents were also asked to list any other challenges or barriers for the seamless transfer of care for opioid overdose survivors from the emergency department to OUD treatment. The most frequently cited responses for this region (in order of frequency) are:

  1. Refusal or ambivalence by patient or family
  2. Availability of beds/level of care required
  3. Availability or wait time for next step in warm hand-off process
  4. Mixed philosophies about standards of practice and MAT
  5. Lack of physician waivers
  6. Lack of 24/7 availability
  7. Stigma
  8. Lack of ED staff awareness of warm hand-off protocols
  9. Lack of access to public funding for treatment
  10. Lack of client ID
  11. Lack of funding/payer issues

For information about the summits visit the pages in the right navigation or email ra-DHWarmHandoff@pa.gov.